Africa

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Africa

Crow is committed to the rescue, rehabilitation and release of orphaned and injured wildlife and believes in action and education with regards to the protection of all natural resources. CROW’s vision is to be an independent, pioneering force in the rehabilitation and conservation of orphaned and injured wildlife, while promoting the preservation of their natural habitat. Isolde Mellet establishes the Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife in August 1977, recognising an urgent need for a rehabilitation centre that could care for injured wildlife and educate the public about the need to protect natural resources. At this stage, she was running CROW out of her garage, receiving 150 wild birds and animals every month. Isolde manages to raise R73 000 needed to turn the “Old Coedmore Waterworks” into a wildlife rehabilitation centre that still operates on the same site today. The waterworks was built in 1916 and closed in 1976. The sterile sand pans are converted into large walk-in aviaries. Open marches, lagoons and enclosures are created to accommodate the various animals that CROW cares for.

 Listings /  Africa

Kloof Conservancy, founded in 1993, is an active, vibrant organisation run by volunteers who aim to promote environmental awareness and conserve our area’s outstanding natural heritage for present and future generations. Special attention is paid to habitat restoration, invasive alien plant (IAP) eradication, sustainable living issues, environmental education, public participation and outreach to previously disadvantaged neighbouring communities as a part of a process of expanding the “green footprint”. We believe that the efforts and contributions of people and businesses are key to the sustainability conservation in Kloof. Kloof Conservancy relies on its community of members and its relationship with the community at large to further its goals. The conservancy aims to be a friendly and cooperative organisation. We aim to be outspoken in our environmental advocacy on a local level, and if required, on a regional or national level. We also aim to foster effective communication with our members, other environmental organisations, and the broader public. Kloof Conservancy has an operational strategy which relies on its membership as a whole but requires individuals and small teams to run or contribute to various projects. In addition we aim to work with like minded organisations in partnerships whereby we can leverage the partners skills sets to jointly achieve more than what we could if we operated on our own. We aim to be innovative in strategies and projects, and easily identifiable to the public as an effective, local environmental organisation.

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SAPREC was established and recognised by Cape Nature in March 2005. SAPREC was founded by Carol Walton who has been working with penguins and sea birds for over twenty years and with the help of Dr Frans de Graaff from Hartenbos Dierehospitaal established the rehab centre in Mossdustria, Mosselbay. SAPREC started with the fundamental reason of rehabilitating sea birds and penguins and their release back into the wild, hence the centre's core purpose being Rescue, Rehabilitate and Release. Many of the sea birds being rehabilitated are under threat and are in dire need of centres like SAPREC to help with the fight against the decline in biodiversity. The African Penguin especially is declining at a rapid rate and is actually on the IUCN Red list of threatened species and classified as Endangered. The African Penguin is the primary sea bird being rehabilitated by SAPREC. The centre is run by Rehabilitation Manager, Shimune. Most of the penguins are sick or injured birds as well as very thin and weak juveniles not getting enough food to survive their first year at sea. Rehabilitating these birds gives them a better chance at survival and in the long run may even help with the survival of the species. SAPREC is a non-profit section 21 company that runs on donations. Please assist SAPREC – any kind of donation or assistance would be greatly appreciated! You are also very welcome to visit us – please contact SAPREC at +27 0823643382 for a booking or for more details on rates and visiting hours or to report any Penguins or Seabirds in trouble.

 Listings /  Africa

Korsman Conservancy is a non-profit organisation of residents and 'Citizen Conservationists' caring for Korsman Bird Sanctuary on The Drive, Westdene, Benoni. Korsman is a natural pan surrounded by a residential area where visitors can escape the city and enjoy the peace of nature. Korsman Conservancy works with Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to protect the biodiversity and preserve this jewel of nature. Korsman Conservancy's vision is to create an indigenous park environment for recreational and educational purposes focusing on children, walkers, riders, families, whilst restoring, protecting and enhancing the natural beauty of the Korsman Bird Sanctuary and surrounding area. Our mission is to preserve in perpetuity the natural environment of the Korsman Bird Sanctuary for the benefit of its creatures and plants and to enhance the surrounding area for the delight of future generations of humankind.

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Birds of Eden is home to about 220 different types of birds, and more than 3500 birds live in the sanctuary. Our award winning bird sanctuary provides a forever home where previously caged birds can live a life of free-flight in a habitat as large and natural as is possible. The feathered inhabitants of the aviary are comprised of a mixture of exotic, as well as African birds. This includes previously caged pets, hand reared and imprinted individuals, which in turn explains why some of our inhabitants, mainly being the parrots, (of which we have 60 different species) are unafraid of human beings and seemingly tame. All new arrivals at Birds of Eden go through a process of rehabilitation before their final release into the main aviary. Most of the birds that arrive at Birds of Eden have a history of being caged in small environments. Many of the birds we home have never encountered other birds. Therefor the main rehabilitation process involves socialization with other birds in large outdoor pre-release aviaries. Here they are given the chance to build up flight muscles, flight control, i.e. practicing landings, change of direction etc. The rest of the release process is based on instinct and it is rather remarkable - all the birds instinctively know which area of the aviary suits their needs, how and where to look for, and find food, water and shelter from the weather. Species recognition is generally immediate, for e.g. when a new Ringneck is released into the aviary, all the other Ringnecks gather to have a look at the newcomer! Releasing new birds into the main aviary immediately without them going through rehabilitation would be tantamount to running a marathon without any training. Sadly, we cannot always accept birds which have been pinioned. A pinioned bird is maimed for life, and will never be able to fly in its lifetime again. We are however able to accept a few species such as the cranes, flamingos and even some ducks and geese. The heartless practice of pinioning is used to ensure that birds cannot fly away. Pinioning is when a section of the wing (the tip) is removed while they are still young. It is an incredibly cruel practice. The winning factor of Birds of Eden has to be its sheer size. The volume particularly, allows for the creation of habitat niches for the large variety of species that find sanctuary here.

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Eagle Encounters is a non-profit wildlife rehabilitation, conservation, education and eco-tourism centre based at historic Spier Wine Farm. Eagle Encounters has a two-fold mission: Rehabilitation and Education. We fund and fulfill this mission through responsible Eco-tourism. Eagle Encounters was founded in 2001 by Hank and Tracy Chalmers. The land, generously donated by Spier Wine Farm, provides the perfect location for our rehabilitation, release, conservation, education and eco-tourism programmes. Eagle Encounters is a self-funded Non-Profit Organization. Hank Chalmers met his first falcon when he was just five years old - his father was one of the first falconers in South Africa, trained by an American. By the time he was 8, Hank was in love with raptors (and a certain beautiful black eagle). Many years later, he and Tracy decided to become active players in the conservation arena and preserve South Africa's raptors for their children and future generations. Hank is hands-on with the rescue, rehabilitation and the conservation programmes and Tracy left the corporate world to administrate and market Eagle Encounters. Today the Chalmers' home is filled with animals of all sorts, and their three children thrive in an environment where every animal (from porcupines to meerkats) and all raptors are welcome day and night. Today Eagle Encounters is a much-loved centre, visited again and again by families, schools, tertiary institutions and visitors from around the world. A tripadvisor winner for several years running, Eagle Encounters is proud of the Certificates of Excellence received in 2014 and 2015.

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The Umgeni River Bird Park was designed and built by Dr Alan Abrey. It is situated in an old quarry site which used to contain water and was visited by Alan as a young boy growing up in Durban. When looking for a bird park site, he remembered it as a perfect option. After a year of extensive land filling, landscaping and aviary construction, the Umgeni River Bird Park was opened in April 1984 by the then mayor of Durban, Councillor Sybil Hotz. The park is situated in 3.5 hectares of lush tropical landscaping and houses an ever-increasing collection of more than 800 birds from 200 species. Some species are the only representatives of their kind in Africa whilst others are commonly kept as pets. The park was created with the aim of educating people about birds and creating an awareness of their beauty and diversity. The past few years has seen this educational focus shift towards a broader view of conservation and biodiversity awareness in general. Signage is continuously being updated and changed according to world-wide trends, visitor requests and expansion of our own knowledge. As well as signage on the cages, we also have other educational mediums in use around the park. The Education Station is in the heart of the park opposite the African Aviary and contains a variety of posters, Rhinoceros Hornbill Skeleton and Information Boards. More exhibits are planned for this space and all exhibits change on a regular basis so there is always something new to learn.

 Listings /  Africa

Austin Roberts Bird Sanctuary was named after South Africa's greatest ornithologist, J Austin Roberts. The University of Pretoria presented the self-taught Roberts with an honorary doctorate for his many achievements, which include the standard South African reference books on birds and mammals. The bird sanctuary was officially proclaimed as a nature reserve on 26 February 1985. The sanctuary is located in the Walker Spruit open space system. Two streams, the Walker and the Argo, feed water into wetland basins, of which nine are small perennial dams that attract water birds such as Egyptian geese, white-breasted cormorant and hadeda ibis. Other species include South Africa's national bird, the blue crane, as well as the crowned crane.

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Our bird and wildlife park is the perfect place for a memorable family outing in Johannesburg. Wander along enchanted garden walkways and marvel at the variety of colourful birds, mammals, reptiles and unusual animals from around the world. In our walk-through Aviary, you’ll find over 60 species of birds including Scarlet Ibises, and Nicobar pigeons, reptiles and small mammals, with smaller antelope wandering freely in the undergrowth. The stars of the Montecasino Bird Gardens are our colourful and talented show birds with skilled displays of unrestrained flight. These educational and entertaining bird shows take place in our Tuscan amphitheatre twice a day on Monday and Friday, and three times a day over the weekend and on public holidays.

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At the World of Birds Wildlife Sanctuary and Monkey Park over 3 000 birds (and small animals) of 400 different species are uniquely presented in more than 100 spacious landscaped walk through aviaries, allowing you the most intimate closeness with nature. A tropical garden setting in the Hout Bay Valley is the environment in which the aviaries are spaced over 4 ha of land, framed by the back of Table Mountain, the Twelve Apostles, Constantiaberg, Chapman’s Peak and Little Lion’s Head. A paradise for nature lovers and photographers, the World of Birds is one of Cape Town’s premier tourist attractions which no visitor should miss. 100 000 visitors annually enjoy the outing to the World of Birds. The Sanctuary also serves as hospital, orphanage and breeding centre, caring for injured birds and animals, and breeding of many bird and animal species behind-the-scenes. Some threatened species successfully bred include our national bird the Blue Crane, the Bald Ibis, the NeNe or Hawaiian Goose, and several rare South American Marmosets and Tamarins. Over the last 35 years, we have cared for over 40,000 birds and animals with no support whatsoever from any official or corporate structure. Please consider making a donation to help us continue this work. The World of Birds Wildlife Sanctuary & Monkey Park believes that by bringing wildlife to the City and bringing people and animals intimately closer together, respect for and understanding of nature is fostered and appreciation for God’s beautiful creation in its diversity is shared.

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The African Bird of Prey Sanctuary is a working facility dedicated to the conservation of indigenous raptors and is base to ongoing research, breeding and rehabilitation projects for birds of prey. The majority of these projects run ‘behind the scenes’ to ensure that the integrity of the wild birds is not compromised and that a high release success rate is achieved. The sanctuary is also, however, home to a wide selection of captive-bred or ‘non-releasable rehabilitation’ birds of prey. These raptors can be viewed in their ‘micro-environment’ enclosures by anyone who wishes to visit and learn about South Africa’s magnificent aerial predators. The African Bird of Prey Sanctuary opened quietly in June 2006, but was an amalgamation or a variety of projects that have been ongoing in KZN for the previous five years. Headed up by Shannon Hoffman, the sanctuary cares for over 180 different birds of prey of 50 different species. Partnering this project is the Mayibuye community, who owns the land on which the facility is built and shares a percentage of all gate takings. We Educate in order to Conserve. Education about birds of prey, and the threats that they face, is an important part of raptor conservation. No amount of research can be effective unless the results of the projects are shared with the greater public. Neither can conservation methods be successfully implemented unless people know and understand what both the raptors and related conservation projects are all about. One of the primary roles of the African Bird of Prey Sanctuary is to introduce raptors, in all their magnificence, to the general public. To facilitate this, a specially trained group of raptors are flown in daily flight displays. These demonstrations allow the raptors themselves to become both teachers and ambassadors for their wild counterparts, so that members of the public can experience these normally rare and elusive birds first hand. It is hoped that people, both young and old, and from all walks of life come away with an appreciation of South Africa’s fantastic diversity of raptor after seeing the birds first-hand.

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Mandy Shrimpton is the quintessential people’s person. Mandy believes that success is measured by the quality of our human-relationships rather than the results we manifest through sheer will. Mandy firmly established herself as the heart of the non-profit organisation that she co-founded and ran with her adoring husband for 17 years. Mandy loves walking in nature with her family, hugging trees, and preserving the environment. She also enjoys being creative and is particularly fond of painting flowers. As a very happily married and devoted mother to four children, Mandy has cultivated a deep appreciation for the culinary arts and relishes the spare moments she gets to watch her favourite cooking shows. This initiative reflects how Mandy sees the world, helping to create positive synergy. Fostering unity and courteous community, building partner relationships and motivating affiliates. Born and bred in Africa, Mandy understands the concept of Ubuntu. I am, because we are. Together we can make the world a better place. Using her skills and experience to make a difference. Helping others see through the fog of new technologies, avoid common marketing mistakes and develop better business strategies. With a subtle blend of motherhood and effective project management, Mandy is the perfect professional partner, to show others the merits of this initiative. Shining a light on the path to prosperity, while not losing our footing in family values and humble humanity. Sharing is caring, while enriching ourselves spiritually and materially. We cannot give freely, if we don't have. "Sometimes the world makes more sense, through the eyes of a mother. Using protective instinct and family fortitude, to help one another." ~ Mandy Shrimpton

 Partners /  Africa

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