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I am 56 years old and love life ! and am engaged to a wonderful man and we have been together for 9 years. I have 1 son who lives in Houston, Texas with his lovely wife and my 2 beautiful grandchildren. I have 1 sister who is sadly disabled. She has Motor Neuron Disease and is paralysed from the neck down. She has had this debilitating illness since 1998. I care very deeply for her and continue to walk this hard, painful journey with her. I would love to one day open up a strung of Care Homes called Mandy in honour of her. Watching your disabled sister struggle every day has been heart breaking but through this I have learnt the art of caring, giving and kindness. To be able to help and be there for those less fortunate than you is a heartwarming experience and exceptionally rewarding. My passion is travelling – I absolutely LOVE IT ! My sport is Golf and because I have such an adventurous, extrovert personality I also love a lot of other things like Boating, Fishing, Cooking, Drinking wine and socialising. The list is so long because I am always willing to try new things and experience new places. I am an extrovert in personality and love bringing out the best in people. My profession at the moment is a Key accounts Manager for a Surgical Equipment company. I have been with them for 14 years. I have vast experience in Sales and Customer service and represent my company by calling on all Hospitals – Private and Provincial throughout the entire Eastern Cape. I work with doctor’s in theatre and am skilled in the sale of Medical Equipment for Trauma, Gynie, Urology, General Surgery, Cardiology, Neurology, Gastro-Enterology, Ultrasound etc. Prior to being a Surgical Rep I was a Medical Rep for 20 years calling on General Practioners, Pharmacists and Physicians selling Pharmaceutical Drugs. I also have experience in the setting up of Vaccine Clinics and GIT Units. My passion is service and looking after my customers. I love to make a difference in everything that I do and work hard. I love to make people smile ! I am a great organiser and get things done. I am very loyal in business and in my private life and am committed to whatever I sign up for. You will always be able to rely on me. I would say that I am a Spiritual person. I have a genuine passion for seeking out the truth of all things. and placing myself on a sacred path of self discovery. I learn every day and try to live my life with a curious, grateful heart. I believe we can all be kind if we want to be and we can all make a difference in someone’s life if we want to. I Want to make a difference in the world ! I know I can.

 Listings /  WorldWide

Crow is committed to the rescue, rehabilitation and release of orphaned and injured wildlife and believes in action and education with regards to the protection of all natural resources. CROW’s vision is to be an independent, pioneering force in the rehabilitation and conservation of orphaned and injured wildlife, while promoting the preservation of their natural habitat. Isolde Mellet establishes the Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife in August 1977, recognising an urgent need for a rehabilitation centre that could care for injured wildlife and educate the public about the need to protect natural resources. At this stage, she was running CROW out of her garage, receiving 150 wild birds and animals every month. Isolde manages to raise R73 000 needed to turn the “Old Coedmore Waterworks” into a wildlife rehabilitation centre that still operates on the same site today. The waterworks was built in 1916 and closed in 1976. The sterile sand pans are converted into large walk-in aviaries. Open marches, lagoons and enclosures are created to accommodate the various animals that CROW cares for.

 Listings /  Africa

Kloof Conservancy, founded in 1993, is an active, vibrant organisation run by volunteers who aim to promote environmental awareness and conserve our area’s outstanding natural heritage for present and future generations. Special attention is paid to habitat restoration, invasive alien plant (IAP) eradication, sustainable living issues, environmental education, public participation and outreach to previously disadvantaged neighbouring communities as a part of a process of expanding the “green footprint”. We believe that the efforts and contributions of people and businesses are key to the sustainability conservation in Kloof. Kloof Conservancy relies on its community of members and its relationship with the community at large to further its goals. The conservancy aims to be a friendly and cooperative organisation. We aim to be outspoken in our environmental advocacy on a local level, and if required, on a regional or national level. We also aim to foster effective communication with our members, other environmental organisations, and the broader public. Kloof Conservancy has an operational strategy which relies on its membership as a whole but requires individuals and small teams to run or contribute to various projects. In addition we aim to work with like minded organisations in partnerships whereby we can leverage the partners skills sets to jointly achieve more than what we could if we operated on our own. We aim to be innovative in strategies and projects, and easily identifiable to the public as an effective, local environmental organisation.

 Listings /  Africa

I am a philosopher specialized in philosophy of mind and language. In particular, I am interested in the nature of consciousness, and the way in which we experience and interpret the world. I started my studies at the Central University of Venezuela in 2006, where I obtained a bachelor’s degree in philosophy (2011) and a master’s degree in logic and philosophy of science (2015). In 2012, the university offered me a position as a professor of philosophy and I taught several courses there until 2017, when I enrolled in a PhD program at the University of Genoa, Italy. I have also published several papers in philosophy journals and participated in various international events. In 2020, while writing my PhD thesis, I realized that I had been immersed in philosophy for too long and decided to use my experience to rejoin the real world. In my years studying philosophy, I have learned many things, but the most important is that the world is what we make of it, there is not ultimate truth, no final word. We create our reality. Knowledge has somehow separated us from others and nature, perhaps it can also reunite us. Although I was born in Venezuela, my family is a blending of different nationalities and traditions. I have lived and studied in different countries, which are all part of who I am and what I want to be. My actions define me, not my nationality or my origins. I do not believe in borders or limits; they are only in our minds. The sensation of not belonging can be liberating, once we realize that, by not belonging somewhere, we belong everywhere. I speak three languages (Spanish, English, and Italian) and I enjoy learning from other cultures, as well as transmitting the values of my own. I also enjoy music, sports and nature.

 Members /  Greater Europe

SAPREC was established and recognised by Cape Nature in March 2005. SAPREC was founded by Carol Walton who has been working with penguins and sea birds for over twenty years and with the help of Dr Frans de Graaff from Hartenbos Dierehospitaal established the rehab centre in Mossdustria, Mosselbay. SAPREC started with the fundamental reason of rehabilitating sea birds and penguins and their release back into the wild, hence the centre's core purpose being Rescue, Rehabilitate and Release. Many of the sea birds being rehabilitated are under threat and are in dire need of centres like SAPREC to help with the fight against the decline in biodiversity. The African Penguin especially is declining at a rapid rate and is actually on the IUCN Red list of threatened species and classified as Endangered. The African Penguin is the primary sea bird being rehabilitated by SAPREC. The centre is run by Rehabilitation Manager, Shimune. Most of the penguins are sick or injured birds as well as very thin and weak juveniles not getting enough food to survive their first year at sea. Rehabilitating these birds gives them a better chance at survival and in the long run may even help with the survival of the species. SAPREC is a non-profit section 21 company that runs on donations. Please assist SAPREC – any kind of donation or assistance would be greatly appreciated! You are also very welcome to visit us – please contact SAPREC at +27 0823643382 for a booking or for more details on rates and visiting hours or to report any Penguins or Seabirds in trouble.

 Listings /  Africa

Korsman Conservancy is a non-profit organisation of residents and 'Citizen Conservationists' caring for Korsman Bird Sanctuary on The Drive, Westdene, Benoni. Korsman is a natural pan surrounded by a residential area where visitors can escape the city and enjoy the peace of nature. Korsman Conservancy works with Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to protect the biodiversity and preserve this jewel of nature. Korsman Conservancy's vision is to create an indigenous park environment for recreational and educational purposes focusing on children, walkers, riders, families, whilst restoring, protecting and enhancing the natural beauty of the Korsman Bird Sanctuary and surrounding area. Our mission is to preserve in perpetuity the natural environment of the Korsman Bird Sanctuary for the benefit of its creatures and plants and to enhance the surrounding area for the delight of future generations of humankind.

 Listings /  Africa

The Hudson Memorial Bird Sanctuary is a carved stone memorial commemorating the 19th century writer and naturalist, William Hudson. He helped to establish the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and campaigned for wild areas in parks, at a time when they were always neat and tidy. The carving, by Sir Jacob Epstein, represents Rima, the child goddess of nature who featured in Hudson's novel Green Mansions, published in 1904. The engravings are by the designer Eric Gill. The memorial was installed in 1924 and was immediately controversial. The Daily Mail wrote: "take this horror out of our park". Today, this area is a refuge for smaller birds, such as robin, tits, blackbird, wren and goldcrest. Hyde Park provides a unique habitat in the heart of London for a diverse variety of species of flora and fauna. Positive changes in management practices have gone a long way to encourage new species into the park. The creation of the meadow area gives a flavour of how Hyde Park once looked and this area has become more diverse year on year since its creation. Have a look during the summer for butterflies feeding off the native wildflowers in the meadow. The trees, shrub beds and herbaceous plantings provide rich habitats for song birds including the robin, dunnocks and tits. Look out for small groups of Long Tailed Tits that hop around from tree to tree looking for insects and nesting materials. However, over feeding of aggressive feral pigeons and squirrels threatens the native song birds as they are not able to compete with these pests. The Serpentine attracts a large number of wildfowl into the park, many of which are winter visitors to the park. Look out for the exotic looking great crested grebes and their spectacular mating rituals. The lake also attracts a large number of insects that provides a perfect feeding ground for bats. The best place to view bats is on Dell bridge around dusk and also close to Serpentine Bridge. Much of the wildlife in the park goes unnoticed by the majority of visitors. This includes a large number of 'minibeasts' such as beetles, bees and ground foraging insects. These insects are a vital component of the park ecosystem and the creation and protection of their habitats is very important for the overall health of the park. Look out for other exotic and unusual visitors to Hyde Park. Recent sightings have included a black swan, a buzzard and egyptian geese.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

The owl sanctuary at Festival Park, was established in 1998 for the rehabilitation and care for injured, abandoned uncared for wild owls, hawks and falcons, with the main aim of caring for these animals until they can be released back into the wild. Unfortunately some of the birds cannot be released due to being bred in captivity, non native species or injured in a way that they could not be released, so they stay with us at the sanctuary. The sanctuary is mainly self funded by going out to schools, or fetes as well as public donations. We do school educational visits, where we spend the entire day and give children the opportunity to learn about these magnificent birds, and children will even get the chance to hold an owl. We also attend shows and fetes where we will display a wide variety of owls, hawks and falcons from around the world. The display will be manned by trained volunteers who are willing to explain about the owls and give you the opportunity to hold them as well, and don't forget it' FREE to visit. All birds are cared for by the volunteers of the owl sanctuary including the owner, Malcolm Jones who has over 47 years of experience.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

WWT London Wetland Centre brings the countryside to London. Although close to the heart of the capital it is a haven of tranquility for both wildlife and people. The Centre holds the Gold Award for Green Business Tourism, and in 2012 was voted Britain's Favourite Nature Reserve in the BBC Countryfile Magazine Awards. WWT Slimbridge Wetland Centre is often referred to as the birthplace of modern conservation. Our founder, Sir Peter Scott, is widely remembered as one of the fathers of modern conservation. Peter Scott was the son of Antarctic explorer Captain Scott who, in his dying letter, urged Peter’s mother to “make the boy interested in natural history”. Peter became an Olympic sailing medallist and a well-known painter and broadcaster. He created the IUCN red list which measures whether species are threatened or endangered. He was the founding chair of WWF – he even drew their famous panda logo. Peter particularly loved the wild open marshes of Britain and the mysterious geese that visited from unknown shores. He started as a wildfowler and learned to protect first the birds, and then their wetland habitats. In 1946 he set up the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust at Slimbridge as a centre for science and conservation. Uniquely at the time, he opened it to the public so that anyone could enjoy getting close to nature. Experience our beautiful & peaceful Urban Wetlands with over 105 acres of nature reserve to explore. One of the most important conservation projects of the 21st century.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Walthamstow Wetlands is a fully operational 211 hectare Thames Water reservoir site which is the main source of water supply for 3.5 million people. Walthamstow Wetlands is also an internationally important nature reserve, providing home and shelter to a wide range of wildlife, from rare waterfowl to majestic birds of prey. In October 2017, Walthamstow Wetlands opened to the wider public for the first time in 150 years. The nature reserve is fully accessible and admission is free of charge. The opening of Walthamstow Wetlands has only been possible due to a partnership between Thames Water, landowner, London Borough of Waltham Forest, grant holder, and London Wildlife Trust, the conservation delivery partner. Of the £10.6m required to renovate and prepare the site, £4.47m was generously funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, £1.8m from Thames Water and £1.8m from the London Borough of Waltham Forest. We also received £750k from the Greater London Authority to support the 2km cycle path through the site. The locally-listed Engine House, including the Visitor Centre and Café, has been redesigned and redeveloped with the addition of a unique swift tower to attract nesting swifts and roosting bats, whilst the Grade II-listed Coppermill Tower offers a viewing platform to enjoy sweeping views of the capital. The wildlife conservation and industrial value of Walthamstow Wetlands is truly unique in London and the opening of the site now allows more people to access its natural and architectural heritage. From our friendly staff at the Visitor Centre and Cafe to our rangers and volunteers, our team based at Walthamstow Wetlands are here to help throughout your time on the site – and we look forward to your visit.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Paradise Park is a wildlife sanctuary and tourist attraction. The Park is family run and home to Operation Chough since 1987, and the World Parrot Trust registered charity from 1989. We have 14 acres and the ‘recommended route’ signs will lead you to the Victorian walled garden, shady jungle walk, the Fun Farm, past Glanmor House to the picnic lawn and play areas. The latest deveploment is ‘The Tropics’ a new range of aviaries designed for colourful parrot species from the world’s tropical regions. At the heart of the new exhibit is the Tropics Walk Through Aviary featuring Bartlett’s Bleeding-heart Dove, Budgerigar, Edward’s Pheasant, Hooded Parrot, Nicobar Pigeon, Palawan Peacock-Pheasant, Red-crested Touraco, Spero Starling, Victoria Crowned Pigeon (the species will change over time – more info here). We grow exotic plants in the walled garden, nectar-rich annual flowers is sunny areas, snowdrops and ramsons in the shade and a new woodland walk is being developed to increase the range of habitats for visitors and native wildlife. The Park is home to over 1,200 birds plus mammals including Red Pandas, Red Squirrels, Asian Otters, Harvest Mice plus the Fun Farm animals. See some of the species information here. We specialise in endangered parrots and many other rare species, with on-site fundraising for many conservation projects, local and worldwide. You’ll meet stunningly colourful birds including from the parrot family, Humboldt’s Penguins, Caribbean Flamingos, Cornwall’s Red-billed Choughs, Golden and Bald Eagles, Kookaburras, hornbills, cranes and so many more. In the summer join in Carrot Time on the Fun Farm with mini donkeys, pygmy goats and sheep, and cute rabbits and guinea pigs. The amazing summer ‘Eagles of Paradise’ display at noon gives you the opportunity to see birds like Archie the Bald Eagle and Tangee the Palm-nut Vulture close-up as they fly over and around you during these very informative and interesting flying displays. Meet the keepers and birds at the end of the show to ask questions and for great photo opportunities.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Birdland Park and Gardens was first established in 1957 in the Cotswold village of Bourton-on-the-Water and was one of the first Bird encounters to open in the UK. The 9 acre site is positioned on a former Bryant and May Poplar Tree plantation famous for its matchstick crop! There are still over 150 trees which create a high canopy for the River Windrush. The beautiful setting is inhabited by over 500 birds. Flamingos, pelicans, penguins, cranes, storks, cassowary, and waterfowl can be seen on various aspects of the natural water habitat. There are also over 50 aviaries featuring parrots, falcons, pheasants, hornbills, touracos, pigeons, ibis and many more. The Desert House is home to the more delicate species, whilst the indoor Discovery Zone features egg laying creatures including fish, amphibians and reptiles. Marshmouth Nature Reserve opened in 2011and has developed into a small ecosystem of the Cotswolds where over 60 species of bird have been recorded, including the kingfisher. Water voles and otters are present as well as grass snakes and hundreds of species of insects and plants. Birdland is very conscious of its role in both education and conservation. Many of the resident species are now part of active breeding programmes controlled by studbooks in co-operation with European and International organisations. We also support conservation by raising funds and increasing public awareness through education. We have supported the research of hornbills in Asia, penguins in Africa, the Atlantic Rainforest Campaign and Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust. Birdland is owned and operated by Livingstone Leisure Ltd.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Birds of Eden is home to about 220 different types of birds, and more than 3500 birds live in the sanctuary. Our award winning bird sanctuary provides a forever home where previously caged birds can live a life of free-flight in a habitat as large and natural as is possible. The feathered inhabitants of the aviary are comprised of a mixture of exotic, as well as African birds. This includes previously caged pets, hand reared and imprinted individuals, which in turn explains why some of our inhabitants, mainly being the parrots, (of which we have 60 different species) are unafraid of human beings and seemingly tame. All new arrivals at Birds of Eden go through a process of rehabilitation before their final release into the main aviary. Most of the birds that arrive at Birds of Eden have a history of being caged in small environments. Many of the birds we home have never encountered other birds. Therefor the main rehabilitation process involves socialization with other birds in large outdoor pre-release aviaries. Here they are given the chance to build up flight muscles, flight control, i.e. practicing landings, change of direction etc. The rest of the release process is based on instinct and it is rather remarkable - all the birds instinctively know which area of the aviary suits their needs, how and where to look for, and find food, water and shelter from the weather. Species recognition is generally immediate, for e.g. when a new Ringneck is released into the aviary, all the other Ringnecks gather to have a look at the newcomer! Releasing new birds into the main aviary immediately without them going through rehabilitation would be tantamount to running a marathon without any training. Sadly, we cannot always accept birds which have been pinioned. A pinioned bird is maimed for life, and will never be able to fly in its lifetime again. We are however able to accept a few species such as the cranes, flamingos and even some ducks and geese. The heartless practice of pinioning is used to ensure that birds cannot fly away. Pinioning is when a section of the wing (the tip) is removed while they are still young. It is an incredibly cruel practice. The winning factor of Birds of Eden has to be its sheer size. The volume particularly, allows for the creation of habitat niches for the large variety of species that find sanctuary here.

 Listings /  Africa

Eagle Encounters is a non-profit wildlife rehabilitation, conservation, education and eco-tourism centre based at historic Spier Wine Farm. Eagle Encounters has a two-fold mission: Rehabilitation and Education. We fund and fulfill this mission through responsible Eco-tourism. Eagle Encounters was founded in 2001 by Hank and Tracy Chalmers. The land, generously donated by Spier Wine Farm, provides the perfect location for our rehabilitation, release, conservation, education and eco-tourism programmes. Eagle Encounters is a self-funded Non-Profit Organization. Hank Chalmers met his first falcon when he was just five years old - his father was one of the first falconers in South Africa, trained by an American. By the time he was 8, Hank was in love with raptors (and a certain beautiful black eagle). Many years later, he and Tracy decided to become active players in the conservation arena and preserve South Africa's raptors for their children and future generations. Hank is hands-on with the rescue, rehabilitation and the conservation programmes and Tracy left the corporate world to administrate and market Eagle Encounters. Today the Chalmers' home is filled with animals of all sorts, and their three children thrive in an environment where every animal (from porcupines to meerkats) and all raptors are welcome day and night. Today Eagle Encounters is a much-loved centre, visited again and again by families, schools, tertiary institutions and visitors from around the world. A tripadvisor winner for several years running, Eagle Encounters is proud of the Certificates of Excellence received in 2014 and 2015.

 Listings /  Africa

The Umgeni River Bird Park was designed and built by Dr Alan Abrey. It is situated in an old quarry site which used to contain water and was visited by Alan as a young boy growing up in Durban. When looking for a bird park site, he remembered it as a perfect option. After a year of extensive land filling, landscaping and aviary construction, the Umgeni River Bird Park was opened in April 1984 by the then mayor of Durban, Councillor Sybil Hotz. The park is situated in 3.5 hectares of lush tropical landscaping and houses an ever-increasing collection of more than 800 birds from 200 species. Some species are the only representatives of their kind in Africa whilst others are commonly kept as pets. The park was created with the aim of educating people about birds and creating an awareness of their beauty and diversity. The past few years has seen this educational focus shift towards a broader view of conservation and biodiversity awareness in general. Signage is continuously being updated and changed according to world-wide trends, visitor requests and expansion of our own knowledge. As well as signage on the cages, we also have other educational mediums in use around the park. The Education Station is in the heart of the park opposite the African Aviary and contains a variety of posters, Rhinoceros Hornbill Skeleton and Information Boards. More exhibits are planned for this space and all exhibits change on a regular basis so there is always something new to learn.

 Listings /  Africa

Austin Roberts Bird Sanctuary was named after South Africa's greatest ornithologist, J Austin Roberts. The University of Pretoria presented the self-taught Roberts with an honorary doctorate for his many achievements, which include the standard South African reference books on birds and mammals. The bird sanctuary was officially proclaimed as a nature reserve on 26 February 1985. The sanctuary is located in the Walker Spruit open space system. Two streams, the Walker and the Argo, feed water into wetland basins, of which nine are small perennial dams that attract water birds such as Egyptian geese, white-breasted cormorant and hadeda ibis. Other species include South Africa's national bird, the blue crane, as well as the crowned crane.

 Listings /  Africa

Turbary Woods Rescue and rehabilitation center offers a unique collection of over 90 birds of prey including eagles, hawks, falcons, owls, vultures and more unusual species. All the birds are housed in large open fronted aviaries, sheltered in a woodland setting. You can experience first hand the breathtaking flight of a falcon. Hawks, owls, and other varieties are flown here at the sanctuary. You can also gain hands on experience and knowledge about these fasinating birds. Turbary Woods, Owl and Bird of Prey Sanctuary is based in Whitestake, Lostock Hall, near Preston Lancashire in the North West. Turbary woods is a pure volunteer based, non profit making Sanctuary. All money raised from Outside displays and shows keeps the Sanctuary OPEN. Every penny we earn is spent on the upkeep and the running cost's, Vet bill's and feeding the birds.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

The York Bird of Prey Centre was established in 2011 and is based within the walled garden at Burn Hall Hotel, on Tollerton Road in Huby. Construction on the current Centre started in late 2012 and was completed in 2013, opening to the public on Saturday 15th June. The Centre is home to over 100 birds, comprising of 45 different species and there are two flying displays every day. In addition there are opportunities to meet and handle the birds throughout the day. The Centre also offers a gift shop as well as a café selling hot & cold drinks, sandwiches, confectionery. The Centre continues to pride itself on the level of audience participation in the displays - so be prepared to get involved! The majority of our birds are hand-reared, safe to handle and you will be fully supervised at all times. We offer a wide range of Hawk Walks, Owl Experiences, and Falconry Courses, available all year round and these can be be purchased as a gift voucher for that special occasion. We also cater for outside events such as Galas, Fétes, Corporate Events and Educational Visits to schools. Private flying displays either at Burn Hall or the location of your choice - indoors or out, are also available. You will hopefully find all the information you need on this site - but please feel free to contact us with any questions we will be very pleased to help. The Centre holds an up-to-date Zoo License and is registered as required under the performing animals act.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Our mission at the Hawk Conservancy Trust is the conservation of birds of prey. As a registered charity, we couldn’t do our work without you and we aim to make your day at the Trust as memorable and as enjoyable as possible. Whether it’s the thrill of holding one of our rare birds of prey, watching world-class flying displays in one of our three display arenas, or simply meandering through our 22 acre grounds of woodland and wildflower meadow, we want to share with you our love of birds of prey and encourage you to join in our mission to conserve them. We care for more than 130 birds of prey from owls to eagles and during your visit, we’ll tell you more about each species and our efforts to protect them. Our purpose-built National Bird of Prey Hospital™ is where sick, injured or orphaned raptors are cared for and where you can take a sneaky peek at some of our ongoing rehabilitation work. Our on-site British Conservation Discovery Centre is home to our Raptor Nest Box Project (RNBP), run by our Conservation Biologist Dr Matt Stevens, for Barn Owls, Tawny Owls, Little Owls and Kestrels. As well as exploring the ecology of nest box use, this project aims to assess how the use of nest boxes impacts the populations of these species. Led by our Head of Conservation and Research, Dr Campbell Murn, our International Vulture Programme (IVP) is a multi-partner initiative that focuses on the research and conservation of vultures. We’re a core member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission’s Vulture Specialist Group (VSG); a growing global partnership of more than 60 specialists working together towards vulture conservation. As a member of the conservation consortium Save Asia’s Vultures from Extinction (SAVE), we’re able to work towards the prevention of the poisoning of vultures and help create Vulture Safe Zones in south Asia. There are special activities and events at the Trust throughout the year which include Owls by Moonlight evenings, Experience Days for all the family and Photographic Days which enable you to get closer to our birds in a more intimate setting. Feathers Restaurant is a spacious and contemporary space. It is fully licensed for alcohol and offers a range of catering options from snacks to meals, and has free Wi-Fi for visitors. The Trust Shop sells a range of gifts, souvenirs and branded merchandise. We can also provide a unique fully licensed and catered venue for civil weddings, parties, corporate events, meetings and private functions. For more than 50 years, the Hawk Conservancy Trust has worked in the fields of conservation, education, research and rehabilitation and your visit goes towards helping that work. You can also help be a part of some of our most important projects by becoming a supporter of one of our programmes or by joining one of our membership schemes where you’ll receive various benefits throughout the year.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

ICBP opened to the public on May 25th 1967 as The Falconry Centre, run by Philip Glasier and family. It was thought to be the only dedicated bird of prey centre in the UK at the time and is now one of the oldest in the world. Under the direction of Jemima Parry-Jones, Philip’s daughter, the centre has become the ICBP we know today, focused on the care and conservation of birds of prey. We became a charity in 2015 to secure the future of our work and mission. Our centre is open to the public to enjoy and learn about our birds and the threats they face. Please ask any of our staff about the work we do! Over our history, we’ve been involved with a variety of conservation and research projects. Our staff work hard to gather vital information relating to conservation breeding techniques and processes, and share this with the wider conservation community. In recent years, our focus has shifted to conserving vultures, particularly in Asia. The birds you see when you visit the centre have played an important role in helping us develop and teach new ways of ensuring vultures survive in the wild. We have partnered on several projects over the years and provide ongoing expertise and support to organisations such as SAVE. Our staff also provide training in elements of conservation breeding, such as artificial incubation, and on site courses for the zoo community. We wouldn’t be able to do the work we do without you. Our supporters have helped us to participate in projects all around the world – including moving some of our bids to Bulgaria to join Green Balkans European conservation projects. At home, we work to rescue and rehabilitate injured wild birds of prey in our on site hospital. We see an average of 100 birds a year and, together with our specialist avian vet, rehab and release as many of these birds as possible.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

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